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How to Remember the Trigonometric Table

Trigonometry is kanalbdg.com a branch of mathematics that deals with the sides and angles of triangles. The most common tasks in trigonometry involve calculating certain trigonometric ratios, namely the sine, cosine, and tangent of an angle within a triangle. By using a trigonometry table or the SOHCAHTOA method, you can easily find the basic trigonometric numbers of the most common angles.

Create a blank trigonometry table. Draw your table to have 6 rows and 6 columns. In the first column, write down the trigonometric ratios (sine, cosine, tangent, cosecant, secant, and cotangent). In the first column, write down the angles commonly used in trigonometry (0°, 30°, 45°, 60°, 90°). Leave the other entries in the table blank.Sine, cosine, and tangent are the more commonly used trigonometric ratios, although you should also learn cosecant, secant, and cotangent to have an in-depth knowledge of the trigonometric table.

Fill in the values for the sine column. Use the expression √x/2 to fill in the blank entries in this column. The x value should be that of the angle listed on the left-hand side of the table. Use this formula to calculate the sine values for 0°, 30°, 45°, 60°, and 90° and write those values in your table.For example, for the first entry in the sine column (sin 0°), set x to equal 0 and plug it into the expression √x/2. This will give you √0/2, which can be simplified to 0/2 and then finally to kanalbdg.com 0.Plugging the angles into the expression √x/2 in this way, the remaining entries in the sine column are √1/2 (which can be simplified to ½, since the square root of 1 is 1), √2/2 (which can be simplified to 1/√2, since √2/2 is also equal to (1 x √2)/(√2 x √2) and in this fraction, the “√2” in the numerator and a “√2” in the denominator cancel each other out, leaving 1/√2), √3/2, and √4/2 (which can be simplified to 1, since the square root of 4 is 2 and 2/2 = 1).Once the sine column is filled, it’ll be a lot easier to fill in the remaining columns.

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Place the sine column entries in the cosine column in reverse order. Mathematically speaking, sin x° = cos (90-x)° for any x value. Thus, to fill in the cosine column, simply take the entries in the sine column and place them in reverse order in the cosine column. Fill in the cosine column such that the value for the sine of 90° is also used as the value for the cosine of 0°, the value for the sine of 60° is used as the value for the cosine of 30°, and so on.[1]For example, since 1 is the value placed in the final entry in the sine column (sine of 90°), this value will be placed in the first entry for the cosine column (cosine of 0°).Once filled, the values in the cosine column should be 1, √3/2, 1/√2, ½, and 0.

Divide your sine values by the cosine values to fill the tangent column. Simply speaking, tangent = sine/cosine. Thus, for every angle, take its sine value and divide it by its cosine value to calculate the corresponding tangent value.[2]To take 30° as an example: tan 30° = sin 30° / cos 30° = (√1/2) / (√3/2) = 1/√3.The entries of your tangent column should be 0, 1/√3, 1, √3, and undefined for 90°. The tangent of 90° is undefined because sin 90° / cos 90° = 1/0 and division by 0 is always undefined.

Reverse the entries in the sine column to find the cosecant of an angle. Starting from the bottom row of the sine column, take the sine values you’ve already calculated and place them in reverse order in the cosecant column. This works because the cosecant of an angle is equal to the inverse of the sine of that angle.[3]For instance, use the sine of 90° to fill in the entry for the cosecant of 0°, the sine of 60° for the cosecant of 30°, and so on.

Place the entries from the cosine column in reverse order in the secant column. Starting from the cosine of 90°, enter the values from the cosine column in the secant column, such that value for the cosine of 90° is used as the value for the secant of 0°, the value for the cosine of 60° is used as the value for the secant of , and so on.[4]This is mathematically valid because the inverse of the cosine of an angle is equal to that angle’s secant.

Fill the cotangent column by reversing the values from the tangent column. Take the value for the tangent of 90° and place it in the entry space for the cotangent of 0° in your cotangent column. Do the same for the tangent of 60° and the cotangent of 30°, the tangent of 45° and the cotangent of 45°, and so on, until you’ve filled in the cotangent column by inverting the order of entries in the tangent column.[5]This works because the cotangent of an angle is equal to the inversion of the tangent of an angle.You can also find the cotangent of an angle by dividing its cosine by its sine.

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Draw a right triangle around the angle you’re working with. Start by extending 2 straight lines out from the sides of the angle. Then, draw a third line perpendicular to one of these 2 lines to create a right angle. Continue drawing this perpendicular line towards the other of the 2 original lines until it intersects with it, thereby creating a right triangle around the angle you’re working with.[6]If you’re calculating sine, cosine, or tangent in the context of a math class, it’s likely you’ll already be working with a right triangle.

Calculate sine, cosine, or tangent by using the sides of the triangle. The sides of the triangle can be identified in relation to the angle as the “opposite” (the side opposite of the angle), the “adjacent” (the side next to the angle other than the hypotenuse), and the “hypotenuse” (the side opposite the right angle of the triangle). Sine, cosine, and tangent can all be expressed as different ratios of these sides.[7]The sine of an angle is equal to the opposite side divided by the hypotenuse.The cosine of an angle is equal to the adjacent side divided by the hypotenuse.Finally, the tangent of an angle is equal to the opposite side divided by the adjacent side.For example, to determine the sine of a 35°, you would divide the length of the opposite side of the triangle by the hypotenuse. If the opposite side’s length was 2.8 and the the hypotenuse was 4.9, then the sine of the angle would be 2.8/4.9, which is equal to 0.57.

Use a mnemonic device to remember these ratios. The most commonly used acronym to remember these ratios is SOHCAHTOA, which stands for “Sine Opposite Hypotenuse, Cosine Adjacent Hypotenuse, Tangent Opposite Adjacent.” You can better remember this acronym by spelling out a mnemonic phrase with these letters.[8]For example, “She Offered Her Child A Heaping Teaspoon Of Applesauce.”

Inverse the sine, cosine, or tangent to find their reciprocal ratios. If you can easily remember these 3 trigonometric ratios using the sides of a right triangle, you can also remember how to calculate cosecant, secant, and cotangent by inverting the ratios of these triangle sides.[9]Thus, because cosecant is the inverse of sine, it is equal to the hypotenuse divided by the opposite side.The secant of an angle is equal to the hypotenuse divided by the adjacent side.The cotangent of an angle is equal to the adjacent side divided by the opposite side.For example, if you wanted to find the cosecant of a 35°, with an opposite side length of 2.8 and a hypotenuse of 4.9, you would divide 4.9 by 2.8 to get a cosecant of 1.75.

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How do I write sec and co-sec values?

Values of cosec, sec and cot can be found by taking inverse of sin, cos and tan respectively for the given angle.

Why tan 90 degree is not defined?